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70. Conference League Wisdom: Kissinger’s Impactful Trading Philosophy

70. Conference League Wisdom: Kissinger’s Impactful Trading Philosophy

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70. Conference League Wisdom: Kissinger’s Impactful Trading Philosophy

Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger’s reaction to the opening statements of members of the Senate POW/MIA Committee before his own opening statement on September 22, 1992 in Washington. DC (Robert Giroux/AFP/Getty Images/TNS)

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Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger’s reaction to the opening statements of members of the Senate POW/MIA Committee before his own opening statement on September 22, 1992 in Washington. DC (Robert Giroux/AFP/Getty Images/TNS) Robert Giroux/AFP

His skin color is just one of the reasons I always look forward to seeing how Henry Kissinger, who died this week after living a century, would explain international relations. It is gravelly and deep and has gotten bigger over the years. But it’s not just a sound. It was his unique accent, eccentric to some, but strangely familiar to me.

I heard that Kissinger, who was born Heinz to a Jewish family in Weimar Germany, spoke his native German and English, languages ​​he learned after the Kissinger family fled Nazi Germany and became Henry. On visits to Germany – which he did frequently while serving as US Secretary of State and later as Her Excellency Grise – he liked to open in German before switching to English, joking that “I’ve reached the stage where I can’t speak in any language without any language.” accent”.

It always makes German audiences laugh. Kissinger was from Fürth, and I’m going to write Fuerth because that’s Bloomberg’s style. This city, which is politically part of Bavaria, belongs to the cultural region of Franconia, which is known – let’s say famous – for its distinctive and not very pleasant-sounding dialect. Heinz takes traces of this accent as Henry in both languages. Over the years, American patterns were superimposed on Frankish patterns in German, making them distinctly Kissingerian. As for his accent in English, which is not typical of German, no one could mistake it except for his own accent.

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This unique combination indicated that he was both an outsider and an insider to both Germany and the United States. This made him a transnational and transcultural person, although throughout his life he was deeply concerned with the relative power and special interests of particular nation-states, and especially his own country, America. “Realism” is the name given to this approach to foreign affairs. Kissinger is considered one of his most important intellectual descendants.

This worldly atmosphere fascinated Americans more culturally than Richard Nixon, who as president made Kissinger national security adviser and then secretary of state. It also had a more subtle but no less powerful impact on postwar German society, who welcomed him – as a guest and speaker, or even always as a policy maker – in part because they did not feel bad about being German.

This point about Kissinger has always intrigued me. I wanted to ask him about it, but then I couldn’t get out of it when I shook his hand for the first and only time at a dinner in his honor hosted by the American Academy in Berlin, of which he was founding president. My question is: Why don’t you talk more about the Holocaust? Why didn’t you take this into account when you negotiated with Germany?

In the 1930s, the Kissingers in Fuerth, like all Jews in the Third Reich, suffered greatly from their increasing exclusion, discrimination, humiliation and hatred. Coincidentally, my own family also lived in Fuerth and knew the Kissinger family. My grandfather, I was told, repeatedly urged the aging Louis Kissinger to move. The Kissinger family finally did, but very late – in 1938, just before the nationwide pogrom known as Kristallnacht. Heinz is 15 years old.

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Henry later learned that 13 members of his family, including his grandmother, were murdered in the Holocaust. He even personally helped liberate a concentration camp near Hanover when he returned as an American soldier to defeat and “denazify” his homeland. The experience was traumatic, he said later, but also made him proud to be an American.

What these traumas did not—what surprised me—was that he hated Germans. Instead, Kissinger was open to studying and advising them and wished them luck in postwar history. He has heard from chancellors, from Konrad Adenauer, whom he sharply profiles in his latest book, to Angela Merkel, to whom he awarded the Henry A. Kissinger Prize, his highest honor. He welcomed Germany’s postwar reconciliation, celebrated its economic and democratic rebirth, and supported its reunification.

That part of his message won’t make headlines this week. This included his diplomacy during the Vietnam War, China and the Soviet Union, the Middle East and South America, all of which were controversial – the late scholar Christopher Hitchens wanted Kissinger tried as a war criminal. But his long-standing relationship with Germany tells a different story: personal generosity and a spectacular strategic turnaround.

Because Kissinger inhabited and embodied two continents, he intellectually transcended at least two centuries. His undergraduate thesis was simply entitled “The Meaning of History”, and his doctoral thesis dealt with the statesmanship of Klemens von Metternich, with whom he was often compared.

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Metternich helped restore order in Europe after the Napoleonic Wars. He also shares biographical similarities with Kissinger. He came from a small principality on the Rhine near Kissinger’s birthplace, at a time when there was no German state, only a vague construct called the Holy Roman Empire, which in its structure and ambiguity was very similar to today’s European Union. (This may be one reason why Kissinger never took the EU seriously.)

But Metternich, like Kissinger, later made his name and career as a diplomat with great power, in Metternich’s case, the Austrian Empire. Kissinger looked at maps in the 20th century as Metternich looked at maps in the 19th century, looking for ways to balance power and interests to maintain order.

The “realist” perspective and long time frame in Kissinger’s intelligence led him to his ideas about Germany. He understood that when the country was divided and weak, it was a danger to Europe; when they are united and strong, another kind. So Kissinger viewed the reunification of Germany and its continental powers as important, but he wanted to contain these resurgent powers within a democratic, pro-American, and pro-Western structure such as NATO. What worries him, as Bloomberg said earlier this year, is Germany’s “inability to understand the transformation of its own position” in the international system and the need for moderation and wisdom.

Part of Kissinger’s legacy is that he was able to convey this message to the German people so that they not only accepted but were grateful for it. Somehow, he convinced them that while he never forgot, he also forgave. Resentment will be easier psychologically. But as a statesman, scholar, and human being, he chose to see Germany and their history as a huge and complex whole.

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And also in their individuality. That’s why he always thought of Fuerth, whose hometown became his hero today, along with Ludwig Erhard, second chancellor of West Germany (and my great-uncle). The city has a football team with the strange name SpVgg Greuther Fürth. Kissinger became a big fan as a kid when the team was good, and has remained loyal ever since, even when the team went through forgettable times in second division mediocrity. While at the White House and State Department, he had staff present him with the latest findings. He sang Greuther’s praises when he was in Germany. And the whole of Fuerth beams with pride at all times.

Henry Kissinger left a complex legacy with a dark chapter for many people around the world. But he did as much for his adopted country as for his birth. “He understood and convinced other world leaders that Germany had learned its lessons after 1945 and could be trusted,” said Helmut Schmidt, another chancellor. “We have this guy to thank for that. Henry Kissinger never forgot his German roots.” He enters the story as Henry without ever rejecting Heinz.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinions of the editors or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Andreas Kluth is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering US diplomacy, national security and geopolitics. He was previously editor-in-chief of Handelsblatt Global and wrote for The Economist.

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▣ Garage Sale Map ▣ Rental Map ▣ Nonprofit Services Guide ▣ Community Support Map ▣ Business Directory ▣ Special Sections The role of the former senior US foreign policy adviser – only 100 years old – is overstated in the Arab world. But that cannot be an excuse for his crimes.

Henry Kissinger, seated second from the right and projected on the top screen, with Israeli President Shimon Peres on the right, at the World Economic Forum meeting in Davos, 2008. (Annette Boutellier, World Economic Forum, CC BY-SA 2.0)

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    1. 70. Conference League Wisdom: Kissinger's Impactful Trading PhilosophyFormer Secretary of State Henry Kissinger's reaction to the opening statements of members of the Senate POW/MIA Committee before his own opening statement on September 22, 1992 in Washington. DC (Robert Giroux/AFP/Getty Images/TNS)Xi Says U.s. And China Can Only Be Adversaries Or Partners, With No Middle GroundFormer Secretary of State Henry Kissinger's reaction to the opening statements of members of the Senate POW/MIA Committee before his own opening statement on September 22, 1992 in Washington. DC (Robert Giroux/AFP/Getty Images/TNS) Robert Giroux/AFPHis skin color is just one of the reasons I always look forward to seeing how Henry Kissinger, who died this week after living a century, would explain international relations. It is gravelly and deep and has gotten bigger over the years. But it's not just a sound. It was his unique accent, eccentric to some, but strangely familiar to me.I heard that Kissinger, who was born Heinz to a Jewish family in Weimar Germany, spoke his native German and English, languages ​​he learned after the Kissinger family fled Nazi Germany and became Henry. On visits to Germany – which he did frequently while serving as US Secretary of State and later as Her Excellency Grise – he liked to open in German before switching to English, joking that "I've reached the stage where I can't speak in any language without any language." accent".It always makes German audiences laugh. Kissinger was from Fürth, and I'm going to write Fuerth because that's Bloomberg's style. This city, which is politically part of Bavaria, belongs to the cultural region of Franconia, which is known - let's say famous - for its distinctive and not very pleasant-sounding dialect. Heinz takes traces of this accent as Henry in both languages. Over the years, American patterns were superimposed on Frankish patterns in German, making them distinctly Kissingerian. As for his accent in English, which is not typical of German, no one could mistake it except for his own accent.Why Henry Kissinger's Career Is A Masterclass In Diplomacy And StatecraftThis unique combination indicated that he was both an outsider and an insider to both Germany and the United States. This made him a transnational and transcultural person, although throughout his life he was deeply concerned with the relative power and special interests of particular nation-states, and especially his own country, America. "Realism" is the name given to this approach to foreign affairs. Kissinger is considered one of his most important intellectual descendants.This worldly atmosphere fascinated Americans more culturally than Richard Nixon, who as president made Kissinger national security adviser and then secretary of state. It also had a more subtle but no less powerful impact on postwar German society, who welcomed him – as a guest and speaker, or even always as a policy maker – in part because they did not feel bad about being German.This point about Kissinger has always intrigued me. I wanted to ask him about it, but then I couldn't get out of it when I shook his hand for the first and only time at a dinner in his honor hosted by the American Academy in Berlin, of which he was founding president. My question is: Why don't you talk more about the Holocaust? Why didn't you take this into account when you negotiated with Germany?In the 1930s, the Kissingers in Fuerth, like all Jews in the Third Reich, suffered greatly from their increasing exclusion, discrimination, humiliation and hatred. Coincidentally, my own family also lived in Fuerth and knew the Kissinger family. My grandfather, I was told, repeatedly urged the aging Louis Kissinger to move. The Kissinger family finally did, but very late – in 1938, just before the nationwide pogrom known as Kristallnacht. Heinz is 15 years old.What Does The Future Hold For The United States And Israel?Henry later learned that 13 members of his family, including his grandmother, were murdered in the Holocaust. He even personally helped liberate a concentration camp near Hanover when he returned as an American soldier to defeat and "denazify" his homeland. The experience was traumatic, he said later, but also made him proud to be an American.What these traumas did not—what surprised me—was that he hated Germans. Instead, Kissinger was open to studying and advising them and wished them luck in postwar history. He has heard from chancellors, from Konrad Adenauer, whom he sharply profiles in his latest book, to Angela Merkel, to whom he awarded the Henry A. Kissinger Prize, his highest honor. He welcomed Germany's postwar reconciliation, celebrated its economic and democratic rebirth, and supported its reunification.That part of his message won't make headlines this week. This included his diplomacy during the Vietnam War, China and the Soviet Union, the Middle East and South America, all of which were controversial - the late scholar Christopher Hitchens wanted Kissinger tried as a war criminal. But his long-standing relationship with Germany tells a different story: personal generosity and a spectacular strategic turnaround.Because Kissinger inhabited and embodied two continents, he intellectually transcended at least two centuries. His undergraduate thesis was simply entitled "The Meaning of History", and his doctoral thesis dealt with the statesmanship of Klemens von Metternich, with whom he was often compared.Enhancing The Regional Impact Of The Chips And Science ActMetternich helped restore order in Europe after the Napoleonic Wars. He also shares biographical similarities with Kissinger. He came from a small principality on the Rhine near Kissinger's birthplace, at a time when there was no German state, only a vague construct called the Holy Roman Empire, which in its structure and ambiguity was very similar to today's European Union. (This may be one reason why Kissinger never took the EU seriously.)But Metternich, like Kissinger, later made his name and career as a diplomat with great power, in Metternich's case, the Austrian Empire. Kissinger looked at maps in the 20th century as Metternich looked at maps in the 19th century, looking for ways to balance power and interests to maintain order.The "realist" perspective and long time frame in Kissinger's intelligence led him to his ideas about Germany. He understood that when the country was divided and weak, it was a danger to Europe; when they are united and strong, another kind. So Kissinger viewed the reunification of Germany and its continental powers as important, but he wanted to contain these resurgent powers within a democratic, pro-American, and pro-Western structure such as NATO. What worries him, as Bloomberg said earlier this year, is Germany's “inability to understand the transformation of its own position” in the international system and the need for moderation and wisdom.Part of Kissinger's legacy is that he was able to convey this message to the German people so that they not only accepted but were grateful for it. Somehow, he convinced them that while he never forgot, he also forgave. Resentment will be easier psychologically. But as a statesman, scholar, and human being, he chose to see Germany and their history as a huge and complex whole.A Rough Guide To Richard Nixon's Conspiracy TheoriesAnd also in their individuality. That's why he always thought of Fuerth, whose hometown became his hero today, along with Ludwig Erhard, second chancellor of West Germany (and my great-uncle). The city has a football team with the strange name SpVgg Greuther Fürth. Kissinger became a big fan as a kid when the team was good, and has remained loyal ever since, even when the team went through forgettable times in second division mediocrity. While at the White House and State Department, he had staff present him with the latest findings. He sang Greuther's praises when he was in Germany. And the whole of Fuerth beams with pride at all times.Henry Kissinger left a complex legacy with a dark chapter for many people around the world. But he did as much for his adopted country as for his birth. “He understood and convinced other world leaders that Germany had learned its lessons after 1945 and could be trusted,” said Helmut Schmidt, another chancellor. “We have this guy to thank for that. Henry Kissinger never forgot his German roots.” He enters the story as Henry without ever rejecting Heinz.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinions of the editors or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andreas Kluth is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering US diplomacy, national security and geopolitics. He was previously editor-in-chief of Handelsblatt Global and wrote for The Economist.Rivalry Between Barcelona And Madrid Takes Turn For Worse
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